SD Grassland Coalition

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If you're interested in learning more from Dr. Noffsinger first hand, join us for one of the four workshops Dr. Noffsinger will be speaking at. The dates are fast approaching. Visit our page for event details and be sure to message us with any questions. ... See MoreSee Less

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2 days ago

South Dakota Grassland Coalition

Check out the latest Our Amazing Grasslands video. Charlie Totten is doing great things on his operation. ... See MoreSee Less

Time for our Plant of the Week!

Prairie cordgrass is a warm-season that grows to a height of 3 to 8 feet tall. It’s a perennial with roots that can extend 13 feet deep. That’s some serious soil stabilization. This sturdy plant gives fantastic cover to wildlife and provides decent quality forage in its early growing stages. Prairie cordgrass will preserve water by keeping snow from blowing. Its perennial root system supports healthy soil structure, allowing moisture to percolate deep below the soil surface.

Prairie cordgrass will grow in many different sites but prefers soil rather than sand. Too much prairie cordgrass in one area isn’t ideal, as it loses palatability fairly quickly during the growing process, but it’s a great species to have mixed in with an array of other native grasses.

You can find this information and more on the USDA.gov website under the Plant Fact Sheet category.

Photo Credit: Jennifer Anderson. United States, IA, Scott Co., Davenport, Nahant Marsh. 2002.
... See MoreSee Less

Time for our Plant of the Week! 

Prairie cordgrass is a warm-season that grows to a height of 3 to 8 feet tall. It’s a perennial with roots that can extend 13 feet deep. That’s some serious soil stabilization. This sturdy plant gives fantastic cover to wildlife and provides decent quality forage in its early growing stages. Prairie cordgrass will preserve water by keeping snow from blowing. Its perennial root system supports healthy soil structure, allowing moisture to percolate deep below the soil surface.  

Prairie cordgrass will grow in many different sites but prefers soil rather than sand. Too much prairie cordgrass in one area isn’t ideal, as it loses palatability fairly quickly during the growing process, but it’s a great species to have mixed in with an array of other native grasses.  

You can find this information and more on the USDA.gov website under the Plant Fact Sheet category.    

 Photo Credit: Jennifer Anderson. United States, IA, Scott Co., Davenport, Nahant Marsh. 2002.

6 days ago

South Dakota Grassland Coalition

“There are two things that interest me: the relation of people to each other, and the relation of people to land.” -Wherefore Wildlife Ecology? (unpublished manuscripts), in Aldo Leopold: His Life and Work ... See MoreSee Less

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Contact SDGC

SD Grassland Coalition
221 N. Main
Box 401
Presho, SD 57568
info@sdgrass.org

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